For the past few months me and my friend Adam Cooper have been putting together a submission for the New Yorker. Adam met with Bob Mankoff yesterday to go over our submission of 10 cartoons. It’s so great that a cartoonist is able to sit down with the cartoon editor of the New Yorker while he goes over your cartoons in front of you! I didn’t make the trip, but Adam filled me in. Overall the response was good and encouraging. While he didn’t buy any of the cartoons, he did set 2 aside for consideration although he said he probably wouldn’t buy them. Above are a few of the rejected cartoons.
A few reasons why they were rejected and some tips:1.) They’ve already run a rodeo cartoon2.) He doesn’t like the way I draw “Mr. Potato Head” noses.3.) They don’t publish Hitler cartoons.4.) They don’t publish cartoons with 2 headed characters. Apparently they published too many in the 30’s.5.) He’d like to see the drawing style a little more grounded and a little less corny. I totally agree with this.
Hearing some of this could dismay some artists, but I really love it. It gives some encouragement to keep going. He encouraged us to keep submitting 5-10 cartoons a week and would like to see us develop more. So that’s the plan. I really enjoy working like this. It’s quick and a lot of fun to draw something new every day. I’m not posting the rest of the submission because I think some of the gags are really good and could be reworked down the road. I’ll keep posting some of the rejected stuff as time goes on, as well as any feedback/tips I receive. Hopefully the work will evolve. If you haven’t read James Sturm’s article on submitting to the New Yorker I highly recommend it. Party on. For the past few months me and my friend Adam Cooper have been putting together a submission for the New Yorker. Adam met with Bob Mankoff yesterday to go over our submission of 10 cartoons. It’s so great that a cartoonist is able to sit down with the cartoon editor of the New Yorker while he goes over your cartoons in front of you! I didn’t make the trip, but Adam filled me in. Overall the response was good and encouraging. While he didn’t buy any of the cartoons, he did set 2 aside for consideration although he said he probably wouldn’t buy them. Above are a few of the rejected cartoons.
A few reasons why they were rejected and some tips:1.) They’ve already run a rodeo cartoon2.) He doesn’t like the way I draw “Mr. Potato Head” noses.3.) They don’t publish Hitler cartoons.4.) They don’t publish cartoons with 2 headed characters. Apparently they published too many in the 30’s.5.) He’d like to see the drawing style a little more grounded and a little less corny. I totally agree with this.
Hearing some of this could dismay some artists, but I really love it. It gives some encouragement to keep going. He encouraged us to keep submitting 5-10 cartoons a week and would like to see us develop more. So that’s the plan. I really enjoy working like this. It’s quick and a lot of fun to draw something new every day. I’m not posting the rest of the submission because I think some of the gags are really good and could be reworked down the road. I’ll keep posting some of the rejected stuff as time goes on, as well as any feedback/tips I receive. Hopefully the work will evolve. If you haven’t read James Sturm’s article on submitting to the New Yorker I highly recommend it. Party on. For the past few months me and my friend Adam Cooper have been putting together a submission for the New Yorker. Adam met with Bob Mankoff yesterday to go over our submission of 10 cartoons. It’s so great that a cartoonist is able to sit down with the cartoon editor of the New Yorker while he goes over your cartoons in front of you! I didn’t make the trip, but Adam filled me in. Overall the response was good and encouraging. While he didn’t buy any of the cartoons, he did set 2 aside for consideration although he said he probably wouldn’t buy them. Above are a few of the rejected cartoons.
A few reasons why they were rejected and some tips:1.) They’ve already run a rodeo cartoon2.) He doesn’t like the way I draw “Mr. Potato Head” noses.3.) They don’t publish Hitler cartoons.4.) They don’t publish cartoons with 2 headed characters. Apparently they published too many in the 30’s.5.) He’d like to see the drawing style a little more grounded and a little less corny. I totally agree with this.
Hearing some of this could dismay some artists, but I really love it. It gives some encouragement to keep going. He encouraged us to keep submitting 5-10 cartoons a week and would like to see us develop more. So that’s the plan. I really enjoy working like this. It’s quick and a lot of fun to draw something new every day. I’m not posting the rest of the submission because I think some of the gags are really good and could be reworked down the road. I’ll keep posting some of the rejected stuff as time goes on, as well as any feedback/tips I receive. Hopefully the work will evolve. If you haven’t read James Sturm’s article on submitting to the New Yorker I highly recommend it. Party on. For the past few months me and my friend Adam Cooper have been putting together a submission for the New Yorker. Adam met with Bob Mankoff yesterday to go over our submission of 10 cartoons. It’s so great that a cartoonist is able to sit down with the cartoon editor of the New Yorker while he goes over your cartoons in front of you! I didn’t make the trip, but Adam filled me in. Overall the response was good and encouraging. While he didn’t buy any of the cartoons, he did set 2 aside for consideration although he said he probably wouldn’t buy them. Above are a few of the rejected cartoons.
A few reasons why they were rejected and some tips:1.) They’ve already run a rodeo cartoon2.) He doesn’t like the way I draw “Mr. Potato Head” noses.3.) They don’t publish Hitler cartoons.4.) They don’t publish cartoons with 2 headed characters. Apparently they published too many in the 30’s.5.) He’d like to see the drawing style a little more grounded and a little less corny. I totally agree with this.
Hearing some of this could dismay some artists, but I really love it. It gives some encouragement to keep going. He encouraged us to keep submitting 5-10 cartoons a week and would like to see us develop more. So that’s the plan. I really enjoy working like this. It’s quick and a lot of fun to draw something new every day. I’m not posting the rest of the submission because I think some of the gags are really good and could be reworked down the road. I’ll keep posting some of the rejected stuff as time goes on, as well as any feedback/tips I receive. Hopefully the work will evolve. If you haven’t read James Sturm’s article on submitting to the New Yorker I highly recommend it. Party on.

For the past few months me and my friend Adam Cooper have been putting together a submission for the New Yorker. Adam met with Bob Mankoff yesterday to go over our submission of 10 cartoons. It’s so great that a cartoonist is able to sit down with the cartoon editor of the New Yorker while he goes over your cartoons in front of you! I didn’t make the trip, but Adam filled me in. Overall the response was good and encouraging. While he didn’t buy any of the cartoons, he did set 2 aside for consideration although he said he probably wouldn’t buy them. Above are a few of the rejected cartoons.

A few reasons why they were rejected and some tips:
1.) They’ve already run a rodeo cartoon
2.) He doesn’t like the way I draw “Mr. Potato Head” noses.
3.) They don’t publish Hitler cartoons.
4.) They don’t publish cartoons with 2 headed characters. Apparently they published too many in the 30’s.
5.) He’d like to see the drawing style a little more grounded and a little less corny. I totally agree with this.

Hearing some of this could dismay some artists, but I really love it. It gives some encouragement to keep going. He encouraged us to keep submitting 5-10 cartoons a week and would like to see us develop more. So that’s the plan. I really enjoy working like this. It’s quick and a lot of fun to draw something new every day. I’m not posting the rest of the submission because I think some of the gags are really good and could be reworked down the road. I’ll keep posting some of the rejected stuff as time goes on, as well as any feedback/tips I receive. Hopefully the work will evolve. If you haven’t read James Sturm’s article on submitting to the New Yorker I highly recommend it. Party on.

"Angry Bill" continues…¬†

Some dumb page from my dumb sketchbook

Here’s another “Angry Bill” page introducing: “Deputy Dan”

2 more pages from the Angry Bill story. 2 more pages from the Angry Bill story.

2 more pages from the Angry Bill story.